Saturday, August 25, 2007

WHO IS BURIED AT CAMP FLOYD?

CAMP FLOYD CEMETERY


Camp Floyd Cemetery iron gate and War Department monument.




Below: The Camp Floyd Cemetery in the early 1900's - barren landscape with scattered sagebrushand some native grasses. The iron fence is not visible. The monument stands alone with no sign of markers to identify graves.

Utah State Historical Society Photograph - Used by permission
Below is a diagram of the cemetery at Camp Floyd. The plots have no numbers at the site. The numbers shown on the diagram are the author's designations and are in the order of the death dates on the markers. Those with circles are for the men who were not part of the Utah Expedition and never came to Utah. Those in squares are for members of the Expedition who died far from Camp Floyd (and many long before there was a Camp Floyd). The plain numbers are for those who most likely were buried in the cemetery, but not under the marker with their names unless by extreme coincidence.
The commemorative monument at Camp Floyd Cemetery

WHO IS BURIED AT CAMP FLOYD?




Not this man. He died of a heart attack during the excitement of the night of September 25, 1857 when a group of fast-riding Mormon scouts charged through the camp of the 10th Infantry near Pacific Springs in present-day Wyoming. These riders were trying to stampede the army's mules. Shulta, a German immigrant and recent recruit, was essentially "scared to death". He was buried the next day, and his final resting place is out there in wyoming.

Not this man either. He died of "bilious colic" on the trail up Ham's Fork about 25 miles north of present Granger, Wyoming on October 17, 1857. Captain John W. Phelps describes the melancholy scene in his journal as McDonnell's body was interred in the sagebrush hillside above the creek as the sun was setting.




Nor this man. Sergeant Irvin was a member of the 1st Artillery regiment in Texas. He died in a steamboat explosion on the Rio Grande River June 15, 1858. No record of the recovery of his body has been located. There is also no record of any part of the 1st Artillery regiment ever being in Utah Territory.







So why do these three and thirty-seven other soldiers who were not buried there have grave markers at the Camp Floyd Cemetery? Five years of checking and double-checking military records and journals have not disclosed the answers. What have been found are the details of the deaths of all but one or two of the eighty-four individuals who are honored with granite markers in the cemetery. There were no sexton's records found.

My research has disclosed:

(1) that none of the markers are over a known gravesite but are simply placed in date order.

(2) that some of the markers are inscribed in error.

(3) that at least forty of the markers represent people who were almost certainly not buried in the cemetery; some died and were buried nearly 2,000 miles from Utah. Eleven (11) of the markers are for soldiers that were not involved in the Utah Expedition; twenty-nine (29) are for soldiers that, although they took part in the Expedition, died a significant distance from Camp Floyd and were buried where they died; and forty-four (44), including a single civilian, died at Camp Floyd or less than a day's travel away and were most likely buried in the cemetery.

(4) At least thirty-one (31) other soldiers who took part in the Expedition and died while so engaged do not have markers at the cemetery. Most died while involved with their units marching to or from Utah Territory or otherwise on duty away from Camp Floyd. There were two among these apparently stationed at Camp Floyd when they died.


Although these are surprising results, they do not represent criticism of those who manage the park today or those who spent many hours in 1959 and 1960 making the cemetery an attractive part of it. It should be clearly recognized that the details of the Utah Expedition were obscure in 1959 when the markers were designed. Records were only available at limited locations, primarily at the National Archives. Even there, they were not always available in the convenient microfilm form of today. Nearly all the records used to come to the above conclusions were found in local depositories. Those who did the work, including procuring the markers and placing them were dedicated to honoring the memory of United States soldiers who died while in the service of their country.


The records searched were Regimental Returns (monthly reports to Army Headquarters), Registers of Enlistments (abbreviated service records of enlisted soldiers which were upated as new information such as promotion, desertion or death became available), applicable journals of members of the Expedition and other various sources. Details of my search can be read below:
I apologize for the simple references to endnotes. The Blog program doesn't like superscript numbers and footnotes.

SO . . .
WHO IS BURIED AT CAMP FLOYD?

By Curtis R. Allen

Gravestones without Graves

The military cemetery at Camp Floyd/Stagecoach Inn State Park at Fairfield, Utah, is one of the few apparent physical evidences of the U.S. Army's largest encampment between the Mexican and Civil Wars. The cemetery was established in 1858 by the army. This army was sent to Utah to subdue the supposed “Mormon Rebellion. The cemetery was abandoned just short of three years later as the troops stationed at Camp Floyd were dispersed to other locations for Civil War service. But as you visit the cemetery today, not only will you see nothing that was there during the cemetery's active life, you will see markers where there are no graves as well as markers for men who were never in Utah Territory. This article will explain the reason for this anomaly, correct the historical record, and provide details of interest for each soldier and his fate.
The cemetery today is surrounded by a high ornamental iron fence and is well maintained. There is a large monument at the cemetery's center. According to the plaque on the monument, it was placed in memory of those “whose remains are interred in this cemetery,” both soldiers and civilians. The monument and fence were installed by the War Department in 1903. The monument was formally dedicated in 1913. In 1960, eighty-four granite grave markers were placed by the American Legion with assistance from the State Parks Department and the Utah State Historical Society. The cemetery with its new markers and a flagpole was dedicated in a formal ceremony June 11, 1960.

If General Albert Sidney Johnston could somehow visit the cemetery today, along with the later commanders of the Department of Utah and Camp Floyd and some of the regimental officers who served there, they would recognize almost nothing. The rock wall that had surrounded the cemetery during Camp Floyd’s active life is completely demolished and the stones presumably scavenged. The intermittent sagebrush has been replaced by plentiful shade trees and grass. There is a general atmosphere of neatness and care. It is a far cry from the barren flat with occasional sagebrush that these officers saw while serving at Camp Floyd. The modern granite markers are arranged in military order, perhaps as were the original wooden ones, but the orderliness is a delusion. The gravestones stretch across, row by row, in eight rows, as if they had just received a command: “Dress Right! Dress!” They are ordered by date of demise but begin with the marker for a soldier who died nearly one hundred fifty miles from this spot and a year before the cemetery was established. The number of markers surely exceeds what would be remembered by Colonel Phillip St. George Cooke, the commander who had the task of evacuating the camp and presiding over the last soldier burial within the wall in July 1861 just before the last troops marched away. Colonel Charles Ferguson Smith would be puzzled by the marker with the name of Captain Matthew S. Pitcher of Smith’s 10th Infantry. Smith himself had reviewed the Regimental Return that noted the letter from the Adjutant General’s Office bringing word that Pitcher had died in New York after a long absence from his regiment because of illness.2
Captain Stephen H. Weed of the 4th Artillery would challenge the marker of Private Thomas Conly. Weed himself had commanded the detachment of troops that clashed with Indians near Egan’s Pony Express station in present-day Nevada in August of 1860. In that fight, Conly had been seriously wounded and the detachment had taken him and two other wounded soldiers to Camp Ruby hoping for their recovery. Conly died three days later, becoming the only soldier with a marker in the cemetery who died from wounds received from enemy action. Yet, the cemetery is not his burial place. Camp Ruby was many days’ travel from Camp Floyd.3
Captain John Wolcott Phelps, also of the 4th Artillery, would marvel at a marker for Sergeant John McDonnell of the 10th Infantry. Phelps had watched the sergeant being buried on a ridge overlooking Ham’s Fork in present Wyoming in the late afternoon of October 17, 1857 when McDonnell had died of “bilious colic”.4 Both Weed and Phelps would recall that Captain Samuel Ridgely of their regiment had died in the vicinity of Washington, D.C. and it made no sense that his body would be under a gravestone in a cemetery in Utah more than 2,000 miles west.5 All would wonder why markers were placed for soldiers from the 9th Infantry, 1st Artillery and 1st Dragoons as none of those regiments participated in the Utah Expedition.
Although attractive and well kept, the cemetery clearly does not represent factual history. Forty of the eighty-four markers memorialize soldiers who died many miles from Camp Floyd or before the site for the camp had been selected. These would not have been interred in the cemetery. The army had no way to preserve the bodies of its dead. Embalming did not become a practice in the United States until the Civil War and was then only used on a limited basis. Bodies were normally buried near the place of death and within a day or two of the demise.
Some of those for whom there are markers were never involved with the Utah Expedition and there is no reason for their names to be on markers at this cemetery. At least two soldiers died at or near Camp Floyd but are not represented by markers.6 Finally, because no burial records have been found and all surface evidence of grave locations had been obliterated before the restoration efforts, the markers are not placed over actual known burial sites. Before the modern markers were placed, substantial efforts were made to determine the location of burials within the cemetery. Herbert Osborne, a specialist in this type of work, was employed to attempt to locate graves. He had no success, finding no evidence of graves whatsoever.
Osborne's report:
801 Genesee Avenue
Salt Lake City, Utah
April 20, 1960

Director
Utah State Parks Commission
19 West South Temple
Salt Lake City 1, Utah

Dear Sir,

It is requested that I send you a statement of our efforts to locate the graves in the Camp Floyd Cemetery. I regret that I cannot report a more favorable outcome.

Usually, it is possible to find graves by several means. There are often surface indications such as the settling of the soil and the evidence of rotting headboards, the stubs of which usually remain in the ground and can be located by the chunk of rotted wood. In this case it seems that the leveling of the cemetery and the repeated scraping has destroyed all surface indication and over the years the settling of the graves has evidently been completed and filled. Therefore this method was entirely unsuccessful.

The second method is that of determining where the ground has been dug and filled. In most cases one finds a layer of clay, a layer of gravel and then perhaps again clay or rocks. When a grave is dug and refilled the strata no longer exists. Consequently, it is easy to determine from the mixture of the soil that a grave has been dug there. At Camp Floyd in sinking holes to a depth of 41/2 feet we find only one color of clay. In sinking numerous holes we were unable to find any strata mixture whatsoever.

Another method is to dig deep enough so that the rotted wood of the casket or perhaps bones could be found but the equipment furnished was not sufficient for this purpose and it is questionable whether or not it is advisable to dig into the grave itself since there might be violent criticism from the public.

We did determine this, that it would be virtually impossible to locate any grave within the cemetery without digging deep enough to uncover or locate actual graves.

Sincerely yours

Herbert Osborne

The cemetery was intended to be permanent in 1858 and was made large enough to accommodate numerous graves—13 rods by 20 rods (214.5 ft. by 330 ft.).7 Even as now fenced to 200 feet by 300 feet, the cemetery could readily receive a number of burials at least equal to the plots now indicated by the markers. When Camp Floyd, which had been renamed Fort Crittenden, was abandoned in 1861, most of the buildings were sold at auction. Some had stone walls (arsenal, guard houses, etc.). Over time, these were removed and the materials used by the purchasers either in Fairfield or nearby areas. Presumably, the cemetery walls suffered the same fate. The grave markers were of wood. A wildfire burned across the abandoned cemetery in the early twentieth century and any remaining markers would have been lost at that time.
Photographs taken in the early 1900’s and 1960 show the ground to be barren or graded smoothly, indicating no physical evidence of the actual placement of the graves. Extensive research has failed to disclose any burial records or other details of plot locations. It is clear that the documents used for placement of the markers in 1960 did not include such records. A representative of the Kearns American Legion post, Rex Bass, stated the research resulting in the list of burials was done by the Government.8 A caption on the back of a photograph taken in June 1960 during the marker placement states the markers are symbolic as no evidence of graves was apparent9. Had accurate burial records been available, the markers would have been placed at the grave plots. Without this information, it was expedient to place the markers in death date order.

Obscure Records

When the American Legion, the State Parks Commission, and the State Historical Society took on the work of identifying those buried at Camp Floyd, they faced a nearly impossible task. Whether it was done by the “Government”, meaning in Washington, or local people is not clear, but the lack of burial records was only part of the problem. Identifying the units and parts of units that made up the entire force at Camp Floyd during its three year life is a formidable task. Units came and went. Individuals, although listed in regimental returns with their station being Camp Floyd, were often on detached duty such as recruiting service, on prolonged sick leave or otherwise located far from the camp. This information is given in the “fine print” on the returns, and is often very difficult to interpret and sometimes almost unreadable.
Most importantly, the records were not nearly as accessible as today. When the modern cemetery markers were being prepared in 1959, many of the sources investigated by the author for this article were either unavailable or not as readily available as today. Research facilities are available now that were then hardly imagined. This lack of availability would have seriously hampered preparation of a list of those who died at Camp Floyd and contributed to the situation that now exists. It is a wonder the project was even partly successful.10
Three lists of “burials” have been produced in recent times11. Two of these lists are almost identical, indicating they originated from the same source records, but the sources are not mentioned in any of them. One includes a note: “Supplied by Mr. Robert Inscore, Archivist in Charge of Military Records, Utah Historical Society.” The third list was actually published after the markers were in place and differs from them only by one name which is not included on a marker.12
The most likely military sources used to compile these lists would have been the Regimental Returns and the Register of Enlistments. Regulations required a return from each regiment monthly which included, among other data, desertions, deaths and discharges in the enlisted ranks. Officer deaths were given in the commissioned officer listings. The Register of Enlistments is a record of the enlistment of each man, including such later events as desertion, discharge, re-enlistment or death.13 The author's review of these documents resulted in the information given in the Marker Group listings below. These list the markers by groups, based on the death circumstances and include the inscription, information from actual death records and commentary where appropriate.
We might speculate why the compiler ignored the place of death when it was noted. One can imagine someone without detailed knowledge of the Utah Expedition units and their movements (as now available from several sources) and, perhaps, pressed for time, skimming names from limited sources under the assumption that the units were in Utah, then the deceased were buried at Camp Floyd. One might also wonder if the compiler might have wanted to honor soldiers who served regardless of where they died. At his leisure, the author has taken a number of years to investigate multiple sources and distill the details from many records to get a comprehensive picture of when and where those who served or supported Johnston’s army died and where they were probably interred.
This compilation is not an attempt to ridicule or demean the efforts of those tasked to install headstones in memory of those who served during the Utah War. Its primary purpose is to ensure that an accurate record be made available. Other recommendations are made later in the paper.


Where They Did Die

When General Johnston led his troops into the Salt Lake Valley on June 26, 1858, he was uncertain where the permanent camp would be established. Tooele and Rush Valleys were considered but rejected. The army camped along the Jordan River at two different locations and then on the west side of Utah Lake, near present Saratoga. On July 8, 1858, the army moved to a camp in the northwest corner of Cedar Valley. General Johnston intended this to be the permanent camp if water, timber and grazing proved adequate. This camp was designated “Camp Floyd, Cedar Valley” and is identified as “Upper Camp Floyd” by the author. In a few weeks, it became apparent that the stream that had been expected to supply water was intermittent and a new location was chosen next to Fairfield, a small Mormon community ten miles due south. The army moved to that camp by September 8, 1858 and completed it sufficiently for full occupancy by early November. The permanent camp is identified simply as “Camp Floyd.” It is reasonable to assume the cemetery site was selected by that time and burials would have commenced.
At least two men, privates Heinrich Grava and Charles Ackerly, died at “Upper Camp Floyd” and both have a marker in the cemetery. They may have been buried at the upper camp or, if the layout of the Fairfield site had progressed to the point the cemetery location was known, they could have been buried in the cemetery. One known fact would indicate they were buried at the Upper Camp. An article in the Lehi Banner, December 12, 1914 tells of a farmer plowing in the area of the Upper Camp uncovering two skeletons. They could have been Grava and Ackerly. Or perhaps one was the body of a teamster known to have died at the Upper Camp, which would leave us with one soldier body missing.
Once Camp Floyd was established, it is most likely all those who died while stationed there, unless on detached service more than a short distance from the camp, were buried in the cemetery. Forty-four men who have markers in the cemetery died in the proximity of Camp Floyd during its active life and were likely to have been interred there. One of these was a civilian by the name of John McCue. These forty-four men are listed in Marker Group C of Appendix A – Cemetery Markers.
In Marker Group A are listed eleven soldiers who were not part of the Utah Expedition and died far from Utah Territory, in Marker Group B twenty-nine soldiers who took part in the Utah Expedition but died far from Camp Floyd. The locations of the various military posts mentioned in the records as places of death are identified in Appendix C. Other death locations are described in the comments for each soldier.
It is also important to know that a substantial contingent of soldiers died while serving in the Utah expedition and are not memorialized in the cemetery. Appendix B – Other Utah Expedition Deaths, lists thirty-one of these. Of these, two soldiers died at Camp Floyd and twenty-nine other soldiers died along the trail, in the Fort Bridger area, or elsewhere on detached service in the military department of Utah.
Almost certainly other civilians besides McCue (Plot 32 in southeast corner of the marker layout) died at Camp Floyd during its three active years. There were dozens of employees in the Quartermaster Department alone. The Ordnance group also employed civilians. Sutlers employed many, directly on the base. Many soldiers' wives served as laundresses. Surely some of these civilians died of various causes during this period.

Marker Ambiguity

Some of the markers have errors in their inscriptions:
1) Brevet Second Lieutenant John T. Magruder, First Cavalry (Marker 20), killed June 28, 1858: Magruder, a graduate of West Point the previous year, was shot by a citizen of Marysville, Kansas Territory, while he was assigned to the Sixth Column of Utah Forces (reinforcing the 1857 expedition). A recruit in the column reports the shooting was the result of an altercation with the citizen. He also describes Magruder’s burial on the Kansas prairie.14 Besides being nearly 1,000 miles from its correct location, the marker at Camp Floyd is in error in designating this young officer as a veteran of the Mexican War. It was his uncle, John Bankhead Magruder, who served in Mexico. John T. Magruder would have been about twelve years old when the Mexican War ended.
2) Private Michael McDonouth, 3rd Infantry (Marker 34): Both the Regimental Return and the Register of Enlistments give the name as “McDonough”. He died in New Mexico.
3) Private David N. Smith, 2nd Dragoons (Marker 28): Register of Enlistments, Roll 25, 205 gives correct name as “Nesmith”.
4) 1st Lt. Owen F. Solomon, 4th Artillery (Marker 56): Date on marker is 1857 and should be “1859”.
5) The marker for Private Charles O’Brien (Marker 84), of Co. B, 2nd Dragoons shows him as being born in New York. According to the Register, Roll 26, 184, he was born in County Tyrone, Ireland and enlisted in Pennsylvania. If his marker had been correct, he would have been the only one of the more than twenty-five Irish Immigrant soldiers with markers at the cemetery (including “McDonouth” above) to have his birth country identified.

Soldiers of the Unknown Tombs

What should be done about the cemetery with its anomalies as described above? Almost any corrective measures would be disruptive. Before anything significant is done, a committee of interested and knowledgeable persons should be formed to perform independent research to confirm or correct information given in this article and to formulate action options.
The most appropriate measure would include removal of the eleven markers for those who were never in the Utah Expedition (Marker Group A, below). These simply have no place in the cemetery. Two of the emptied spaces would be filled with new markers for the two men in Appendix B, listing of Other Utah Expedition Deaths, that most likely died at Camp Floyd. The other emptied spaces plus other space in the cemetery could provide for markers for the others listed as “Other Deaths” in the Appendix. This would basically convert the cemetery into a memorial park, as the fact that the bodies, in all cases, are not located at the markers. The concept of a memorial park is appropriate as every one of those with markers (with the exception of the single civilian) and the others of the Utah Expedition who died while serving in it were members of the United States Regular Army and are deserving of whatever honor the marker can provide. Of course, markers found to be incorrectly inscribed would be corrected.
The minimum that should be done is to make it clear to those who visit the cemetery to see the graves of relatives be informed that the headstones do not mark real graves and the probable burial site may be other than Camp Floyd
There is little need to continue perpetuating error when the true facts can be determined. While the Camp Floyd cemetery does an important job of noting the sacrifices of those who served their country, the information on the markers is often flawed and misleading. This compilation corrects the historical record and provides the basis for any future efforts to ensure that the purpose of the cemetery is accomplished in remembering all who served and in recognizing the accurate facts of those who are not interred at Camp Floyd but are equally worthy of being remembered.

Appendix A – Cemetery Markers

The modern markers at the cemetery have no plot numbers and are simply arranged by order of death, beginning with the southwest corner of the marker pattern. The layout of the cemetery is shown diagrammatically above, with the markers numerically identified by their date order. The single exception is the marker of John McCue, the lone civilian employee. His marker is number 32 chronologically but is in the last place of the marker positions.
The names on the markers in the cemetery are grouped as follows:
* Marker Group A: Persons who were never part of the Utah Expedition and died far from Utah Territory.
* Marker Group B: Persons who took part in the Utah Expedition but died far from Camp Floyd.
* Marker Group C: Persons who died while stationed at Camp Floyd and most likely were buried in the cemetery, exact locations unknown.

The following listing provides details of the deaths of those whose names are on the markers. Names are listed alphabetically in each section. The source(s) of the information is also noted. Each entry includes the marker number as described above and inscription from the marker in upper case letters (sometimes modified for clarity only). Death information is taken largely from the Regimental Returns15 of the respective units or, in a few instances as noted, from other sources. The information in the sources is quoted as closely as possible and is in lower case. No additional details are available except in a few instances where a diary or journal makes mention of it. The spelling as given in the sources is maintained and sometimes differs from that on the marker. The place of death is either as given in the source, or in a few instances, inferred from the location of the individual's company at time of death. General comments by the author are made after the date of death and source comments are enclosed in parentheses in the field for sources. Cause of death is noted if given in the source. The ellipsis ( . . .) is used to indicate illegible information in the sources. Differences in dates engraved on the markers and those given in the sources occur occasionally, probably because of the difficulty of interpreting old records.


Marker Group A – Did not participate in the Utah Expedition.

JOHN FINIGAN (Marker 53, Group A)
PRIVATE, CO G 9 REGT INFANTRY, AUGUST 14 1859
Place of death: Dalles City, Oregon. No part of the 9th Infantry was ever at Camp Floyd.
Source: Return (September 1859): Died, Pvt. John Finigan, G Co 14 Aug 59 Dalles City, O. Killed on the night of the 14th of Aug at Dalles City, Oreg.

NEWTON GIVENS (Marker 39, Group A)
KENTUCKY, CAPT CO B 2 REGT DRAGOONS, MEXICAN WAR, MARCH 9 1859
Place of death: San Antonio, Texas. Although Givens’s regiment was part of the Utah Expedition, he was sick in Texas and never joined the march to Utah.
Source: Return (April 1859): Died: Captain Newton Curd Givens, at San Antonio, Texas March 9th, '59 . . . letter from . . . dated San Antonio, March 9th 59.

SAMUEL IRVIN (Marker 16, Group A)
SERGEANT, CO F 1 REGT ARTILLERY, JUNE 15 1858
Place of death: Somewhere in Texas. No part of the 1st Artillery regiment was involved with the Utah Expedition16.
Source: Return (August 1858): Died, Irvin, Samuel, Sergt., F, Jun 15, by the explosion of a steam boat. (No place stated17. According to the returns of previous months, Irvin had been on detached service somewhere in Texas; his company was stationed at Ringgold Barracks on the Rio Grande in Texas at the time. It is not stated whether or not Irvin's body was recovered.)

THOMAS LAWLER (Marker 18, Group A)
PRIVATE, CO H 3 REGT ARTILLERY, JUNE 21 1858
Place of death: Ft. Yuma, Calif. Company H of the 3rd Artillery was not part of the Utah Expedition.
Source: Return (June 1858): Died, Pvt. Thomas Lawler, Co H, June 4, '58, Ft. Yuma, Calif. (No cause stated.)

MICHAEL MCDONOUTH (Marker 34, Group A)
PRIVATE, CO G 3 REGT INFANTRY, NOVEMBER 27 1858
Place of death: Fort Defiance, N.M. (now Arizona). Company G of the 3rd Infantry was not part of the Utah Expedition. Only Companies A (with a few men from Company D), E and F of that regiment made the journey from New Mexico with Captain Randolph Marcy in early 1858. Those units entered the Salt Lake Valley with the rest of Johnston's Army but only camped briefly at the north end of Cedar Valley [Upper Camp Floyd] and then traveled back to New Mexico.
Source: Return (November 1858): Died, Pvt. Michael M. McDonough, Co G, Nov. 27 '58, Ft. Defiance, shot whilst in confinement. (Register of Enlistments18 states: "Shot by Pvt. Jno. Corbett of his Co." The name "McDonouth" is obviously a transcription error made during the marker production process.)

JOHN MCKAY (Marker 49, Group A)
PRIVATE, CO G 1 REGT DRAGOONS, JULY 18 1859
Place of death: Fort Buchanan, N.M. The 1st Dragoons did not participate in the Utah Expedition.
Source: Return (July 1859): Died, Pvt. J. McKay, Co G, 18 July/59, Fort Buchanan, N.M. (No cause stated.)

JOHN MCGOWAN (Marker 30, Group A)
PRIVATE, CO L 4 REGT ARTILLERY, NOVEMBER 13 1858
Place of death: Camp Walbach, near Cheyenne (now Wyoming). Company "L" of the 4th Artillery was diverted to service in the District of the Platte and was never in Utah Territory.
Source: Return (November 1858): Died, Pvt. John McGowan . . . Camp Wallbach, N.T. (Register, Roll 25, 159 shows cause was "Chronic Diarrhoea."19)

JOHN O'REGAN (Marker 47, Group A)
PRIVATE, CO K 2 REGT DRAGOONS JULY 9 1859
Place of death: The Green River, U.T. (now Wyoming)
Source: Return (July 1859): Died, Pvt. John O'Regan, (company letter illegible), July 9 '59, Drowned at Green River.

MATTHEW S PITCHER (Marker 25, Group A)
NEW YORK, CAPT CO F 10 REGT INFANTRY, MEXICAN WAR, SEPTEMBER 17 1858
Place of death: New York. Pitcher’s regiment was part of the Utah Expedition; however he was sick in New York and was not able to join in the march to Utah.
Source: Return (January 1859): Died, Capt. Matthew Pitcher, at New York, NY September 17, 1858 per letter received from A.G.O. date of Washington, D.C. December 8, 1858.

SAMUEL C RIDGELY (Marker 46, Group A)
MARYLAND, BVT MAJOR 4 REGT ARTILLERY, MEXICAN WAR, JULY 6 1859
Place of death: Vicinity of Washington, D.C.. Ridgely had been sick in Baltimore for several months with certification of Surgeon McDougall, USA, of that city.
Source: Return (July 1859): Died of disease: Bvt. Major Samuel C. Ridgely, 6 July 1859 per letter A.G.O., Washington, D.C.

GEORGE SMITH (Marker 17, Group A)
PRIVATE, CO E 4 REGT ARTILLERY, JUNE 16 1858
Place of death: Kansas Territory
Source: Return (July 1858): Died, Pvt. George Smith, Co C, 16 or 18 June 1858, Camp on Big Blue, K.T., from the effects of injuries received . . . of the guards of . . . while a prisoner in the charge of said guards.

Marker Group B – Participated in the Utah Expedition but died in places far from Camp Floyd.

CHARLES W AKERLY (Marker 23, Group B)
NEW YORK, PRIVATE, NEW YORK, CO A 5 REGT INFANTRY, AUGUST 1 1858
Place of death: Upper Camp Floyd
Source: Return (August 1858): Died, Pvt. Charles Ackerly, Co A, Aug 1,'58, Camp Floyd (No cause stated).

WILLIAM BRUTKUHL (Marker 5, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO E 10 REGT INFANTRY, OCTOBER 12 1857
Place of death: Ham's Fork
Source: Return (October 1857): Died, Pvt. William Brutkuhl, Co E, October 12, 1857, Camp on Ham's Fork . . . .

PATRICK CAVANAUGH (Marker 8, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO H 5 REGT INFANTRY, NOVEMBER 28 1857
Place of death: Camp Scott
Source: Return (November 1857): Died, Pvt. Patrick Cavanaugh, Co H, Nov 9,'57, Camp Scott, ordinary disease.

THOMAS CONLY (Marker 81, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO B 4 REGT ARTILLERY, AUGUST 13 1860
Place of death: Camp Ruby
Source: Return (August 1860): Died, Pvt. Thomas Conly, Co B, Aug 13, 1860, Ruby Valley, U.T., of wounds received in action with Indians at Egan Canyon, U.T. August 11, 1860.

PATRICK CONWAY (Marker 21, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO F 10 REGT INFANTRY, MEXICAN WAR, JUNE 30 1858
Place of death: Fort Bridger. As the death date is two weeks after the army had abandoned Camp Scott, Conway may have been left sick with the small garrison at Fort Bridger.
Source: Return (August 1858): Died, Pvt. Patrick Conway, Co F, June 30, '58, Fort Bridger. (No cause stated. Register of Enlistments gives the name as “Conroy”.)

EDWARD CRAWLY (Marker 12, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO C 10 REGT INFANTRY, MARCH 30 1858
Place of death: Camp Scott
Source: Return (March 1858): Died, Pvt. Edward Crawley, Co C, Mar. 30, '58, Camp Scott, Congestion of the brain.

JAMES CURREN (Marker 7, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO B 10 REGT INFANTRY, NOVEMBER 11 1857
Place of death: Camp Scott. Another soldier was shooting at a beef for slaughter and missed, the bullet entering the tent occupied by Curren, hitting him in the head and killing him instantly.20
Source: Return (November 1857): Died, Pvt. James Curren, Co B, Nov. 11, 1857, Black's Fork, Accidentally shot.

FRED DICKINSON (Marker 50, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO A 5 REGT INFANTRY, AUGUST 6 1859
Place of death: Medicine Butte area near present-day Evanston, Wyoming. Dickinson had been left sick at Fort Laramie since July 22, 1859.
Source: Return (September 1859): Died, Pvt. Frederick Dickinson, Co A, Aug 6, 1859, in camp near the Medicine Butte while en route to Camp Floyd to rejoin his company.

THOMAS DREW (Marker 14, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO B 10 REGT INFANTRY, MAY 21 1858
Place of death: Camp Scott
Source: Return (May 1858): Died, Pvt. Thomas Drew, Co B, May 21, '58, Camp Scott. (No cause stated.)

MICHAEL FLYNN (Marker 11, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO G 2 REGT DRAGOONS, MARCH 29 1858
Place of death: Fort Bridger area. Gove writes: “A duel came off at this fort on the 1st of April between Mr. Bleasingdale, of New York City, a clerk of Livingston and Kinkead, . . . Bleasingdale was badly wounded. Flynn was also wounded in the leg so badly that amputation was necessary . . . The patient proved too weak and death ensued.”21
Source: Return (April 1858): Died, Pvt. Michael Flynn, Co G, Mar 29, 58, Ft. Bridger (No cause stated in the Return.)

JOHN GERBER (Marker 24, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO F 7 REGT INFANTRY, AUGUST 29 1858
Place of death: Big Sandy Creek, U.T. (now Wyoming)
Source: Return (August 1858): Died, Pvt. John Gerber, Co F, Aug. 29/58 near Big Sandy Creek en route to Utah, of disease.

HEINRICH GRAVA (Marker 22, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO G 5 REGT INFANTRY, JULY 29 1858
Place of death: Upper Camp Floyd
Source: Return (July 1858): Died, Pvt. Heinrich Grava, Co G, July 29, 1858, Camp Floyd, U.T. (No cause stated.)

JACOB F HILT (Marker 29, Group B)
MARYLAND, PRIVATE, CO I 2 REGT DRAGOONS, NOVEMBER 10 1858
Place of death: Fort Bridger
Source: Return (November 1858): Died, Jacob G. Hilt, Farrier, Nov 10th, 58, Ft. Bridger, of typhoid fever22. (Hilt's rank is given as Farrier23 in both the Return and the Soldiers and Sailors System.24)

JOHN KOCK (Marker 9, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO K 5 REGT INFANTRY, JANUARY 15 1858
Place of death: Camp Scott
Source: Return (June 1858): Died, Pvt. John Kock, Co K, Jan 15, '58, Camp Scott, ordinary disease.

JOHN T MAGRUDER (Marker 20, Group B)
VIRGINIA, BVT 2D LT, 1 REGT CAVALRY, MEXICAN WAR, JUNE 28 1858
Place of death: Marysville, Kansas Territory. He was not in the Mexican War; he was only 12 years old at that time and is probably misidentified with General John Bankhead Magruder [an uncle] who did serve in that conflict and the Civil War. Some details of the Magruder murder will be found in To Utah with the Dragoons, edited by Harold D. Langley and published by the University of Utah Press, 1974, see pages 28 and 29.) A temporary camp established in 1860 in the vicinity of Magruder’s burial place was called “Camp Magruder”.25
Source: Return (June 1858): Died, 2nd Lt. John T. Magruder, 28 Jun 1858, near Marysville, K.T. shot by a citizen of Marysville.

JOHN MCDONNELL (Marker 6, Group B)
SERGEANT, CO E 10 REGT INFANTRY, OCTOBER 17 1857
Place of death: Camp on Ham's Fork, north of Fort Bridger. Phelps states cause of death was bilious colic, and that First Sergeant McDonnell was buried on a hillside at the camp on Ham's Fork where the troops had marched to try to enter the Salt Lake Valley by way of Bear River Valley, Soda Springs and Malad Valley. The camp was about 55 miles from the Ham's Fork crossing, probably near present-day Kemmerer, Wyoming.26
Source: Return (October 1857): Died, Sgt. John McDonnell, Co E, October 17, 1857, Camp on Ham's Fork . . .

MICHAEL MCGRATH (Marker 2, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO C 10 REGT INFANTRY, OCTOBER 4 1857
Place of death: Ham’s Fork area.
Source: Return (October 1857): Died, Pvt. Robert McGrath, Co . . . October 4, 1857, of remittent fever.

WILLIAM C MERTENS (Marker 19, Group B)
CORPORAL, CO F 3 REGT INFANTRY, JUNE 22 1858
Place of death: Weber River. The journal of 2nd Lt. John Van Deusen DuBois27 records the death and burial of Mertens without mentioning his name or cause of death. In his entry of June 23rd, DuBois records: "We lost a man by death & buried him this morning."
Source: Return (June 1858): Died, Pvt. Wm. Mertens, Comp. F, June 22 58, Camp on Weber River. (No cause stated.)

JOSEPH MILLER (Marker 80, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO B 4 REGT ARTILLERY, JULY 15 1860
Place of death: Smith's Fork
Source: Return (July 1860): Died, Pvt. Joseph Miller, Co B, Smith's Fork, of apoplexy induced by over work while on scout.

ALEXANDER MORGENSTERN (Marker 15, Group B)
RECRUIT, 5 REGT INFANTRY, JUNE 7 1858
Place of death: En route to Utah.
Morgenstern was part of a detachment of infantry recruits destined for Camp Floyd under the command of officers of the 5th Infantry.
Source: Register, Roll 26, 140: Died, 5 June '58, enroute to Utah, a private. (There is a two-day date discrepancy between the source and the marker.)

JOHN RENTMASTER (Marker 77, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO K 7 REGT INFANTRY, MAY 22 1860
Place of death: Probably near present-day Thistle, Utah
Source: Return (May 1860): Died, Pvt. John Rentmaster, Co K, May 23 1860, Camp No. 6 en route to N. Mexico - shot by accident.

MORITZ RILLMANN (Marker 3, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO E 10 REGT INFANTRY, OCTOBER 7 1857
Place of death: Camp Winfield
Source: Return (October 1857): Died, Pvt. Moritz Rillman, Co E, Camp Winfield . . . (On Ham’s Fork; no cause stated.)

JOHN RYAN (Marker 10, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO E 10 REGT INFANTRY, FEBRUARY 15 1858
Place of death: Camp Scott
Source: Return (January 1858): Died, Pvt. John Ryan, Co E, Feb. 15, '58, Camp Scott. (No cause stated.)

GOTLIEB SANDER (Marker 4, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO E 10 REGT INFANTRY, OCTOBER 10 1857
Place of death: near Fort Bridger
Source: Return (October 1857): Died, Pvt. Gotlieb Sander, October 10, 1857, Camp Winfield. (No cause stated.)

HENRY SHULTA (Marker 1, Group B)
PRIVATE, 10 REGT INFANTRY, SEPTEMBER 25 1857
Place of death: Near South Pass (in present Wyoming). Gove writes this man died of fright and was buried the same day, entry of September 25, 1857.28
Source: Return (September 1857): Died, Pvt. Henry Shulter, Co H, Sep. 25, 1857, Camp on Pacific . . . Disease of the heart.

DAVID N SMITH (Marker 28, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO F 2 REGT DRAGOONS, OCTOBER 23 1858
Place of death: Fort Laramie area
Source: Return (October 1858): Died, Pvt. David N. Smith, Co . . . , 23rd, near Ft. Supply. (Near Laramie? Location not certain. Register, Roll 25, 205 shows cause as "Accidentally shot" and gives the correct name as "Nesmith".)

OWEN F SOLOMON (Marker 56, Group B)
GEORGIA, 1ST LIEUTENANT, CO A 4 REGT ARTILLERY, SEPTEMBER 27 1857 (Marker shows 1857 but should be 1859.)
Place of death: Nebraska Territory, Fort Laramie
Source: Return (November 1859): Died of disease: 1st Lt. Owen Solomon, Sep. 27, '59, . . . N.T. (He had been assigned to West Point as an instructor, per Sept. 1859 Return, October Return notes he left Camp Floyd Sept. 1, 1859 on his way to that assignment. November Return provides death information.)

JOHN WALSH (Marker 79, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO D 5 REGT INFANTRY, JULY 12 1860
Place of death: Sevier River, U.T.
Source: Return (July 1860): Died, Pvt. John Walsh, Co D, July 12, 1860, Sevier River, U.T., en route to New Mexico, of ordinary disease.

JAMES D WAUGH (Marker 13, Group B)
PRIVATE, CO K 5 REGT INFANTRY, MAY 1 1858
Place of death: Camp Scott
Source: Return (May 1858): Died, Pvt. James D. Waugh, Co K, May 1, 1858, Camp Scott. (No cause stated.)


Marker Group C – Died at or near Camp Floyd

JAMES BERGEN (Marker 78, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO C 4 REGT ARTILLERY, JUNE 27 1860
Source: Return (June 1860): Died, Pvt. James Bergen, Co C, June 27, '60, Camp Floyd, Accidentally drowned.

WILLIAM BRYAN (Marker 65, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO I 7 REGT INFANTRY, DECEMBER 27 1859
Source: Return (December 1859): Killed: Pvt. William Bryan, Co I, Dec 27, '59, Camp Floyd, U.T., murdered - His body being found several hours after death in Fairfield near Camp Floyd, U.T.

BENJAMIN F EDINGER (Marker 62, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO C 4 REGT ARTILLERY, DECEMBER 11 1859
Source Return (December 1859): Died, Pvt. Benjamin Edinger, Co C, Dec. 11, '59, Camp Floyd, U.T. (No cause stated.)

EDWARD FARRELL (Marker 44, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO F 10 REGT INFANTRY, MAY 12 1859
Source: Return (May 1859): Died, Pvt. Edward Farrell, Co F, May 12, '59, (Camp Floyd) Died of gunshot wounds inflicted by himself.

GEORGE FUHR (Marker 76, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO G 5 REGT INFANTRY, MAY 17 1860
Source: Return (May 1860): Died, Pvt. George Fuhr, Co G, May 17, 1860, Camp Floyd, U.T., Ordinary disease.

DANIEL GALLAGHER (Marker 54, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO B 7 REGT INFANTRY, SEPTEMBER 1 1859
Source: Return (September 1859): Died, Pvt. Daniel Gallagher, Co G, Sep 4, 1859, Camp Floyd, U.T., Pneumonia.

ROBERT GIERS (Marker 59, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO I 10 REGT INFANTRY, NOVEMBER 7 1859
Source: Return (November 1859): Died, Pvt. Robert Giers, Co I, Novbr 7, 1859, Camp Floyd, of typhoid fever.

PATRICK GOODMAN (Marker 66, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO I 7 REGT INFANTRY, JANUARY 2 1860
Source: Return (January 1860): Died, Pvt. Patrick Goodman, Co I, Jan 2/60, Camp Floyd, U.T. of pneumonia.

CHARLES R GREEN (Marker 51, Group C)
NEW YORK, SERGEANT, CO E 2 REGT DRAGOONS, AUGUST 6 1859
Source: Return (August 1859): Died, Sergt. Charles R. Green, Co C, Aug 6 '59, Camp Floyd, of wounds inflicted by himself.

JAMES HARDY (Marker 64, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO B 2 REGT DRAGOONS, DECEMBER 21 1859
Source: Return (December 1859): Died, James Hardy . . . Camp Floyd, . . . (Date and cause illegible.)

JOHN E ISAACS (Marker 26, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO D 7 REGT INFANTRY, SEPTEMBER 27 1858
Source: Return (September 1858): Died, Private John E. Isaacs, Co D, Sep 29, '58, Camp Floyd, U.T., of disease.

PATRICK KENNEDY (Marker 75, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO B 2 REGT DRAGOONS, APRIL 9 1860
Source: Return (April 1860): Died, Private Patrick Kennedy, Co B, . . . , Camp Floyd. (No cause stated.)

ANTIOW KRAUSE (Marker 60, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO A 7 REGT INFANTRY, NOVEMBER 26 1859
Source: Return (November 1859): Died, Antion Krause, Private, A, Nov 25 '59, Camp Floyd, U.T. of Typhoid fever. (Spelling in Return is “Antion”.)

RICHARD MAHERS (Marker 82, Group C)
RECRUIT, 4 REGT ARTILLERY, SEPTEMBER 17 1860
Probably died at Camp Floyd as both Companies A and C were at Camp Floyd on the date noted on the marker.
Source: National Park Service Soldiers and Sailors System shows: Richard Mahers, Recruit, 4th U.S. Regiment Artillery, serving in companies A and C. (No death date mentioned.)

JAMES L MAIN (Marker 55, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO A 7 REGT INFANTRY, SEPTEMBER 13 1859
Source: Return (September 1859): Died, Pvt. James M. Maine, Co A, Sep 13, 1859, Camp Floyd, U.T., Ebritus.29

JAMES MCCABE (Marker 58, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO D 7 REGT INFANTRY, NOVEMBER 5 1859
Source: Return (November 1859): Died, James McCabe, Private, D, Nov. 5th 59, Camp Floyd, U.T., of phthisic pulmonatis (Register, Roll 26, 179 indicates “consumption”.)

JOHN MCCUE (Marker 32 / In Row 8, Group C)
CIVILIAN, ORDNANCE DEPT, NOVEMBER 20 1858
Probably died at Camp Floyd. There were many civilian employees in the ordnance and quartermaster departments at Camp Floyd. McCue, the cemetery’s only civilian, is named on a marker in row 8, out of place chronologically.
Source: Not found in returns; shows in Soldiers and Sailors System as a laborer.

ARCHIBALD T MCDOUGAL (Marker 27, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO E 10 REGT INFANTRY, OCTOBER 12 1858
Source: Return (October 1858): Died, Pvt. A. T. McDougal, Co E, Oct. 12, '58, Camp Floyd. (No cause stated.)

DANIEL MCNICKLE (Marker 33, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO B 5 REGT INFANTRY, NOVEMBER 24 1858
Source: Return (November 1858): Died, Pvt. Daniel McNickel, Co. B, Nov. 24, '58, Camp Floyd. (No cause stated.)

JOHN MEANS (Marker 48, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO H 2 REGT DRAGOONS, JULY 17 1859
Source: Return (July 1859): Died, Pvt. John Means, Co. H, July 18, '59, Camp Floyd, of disease.

WILLIAM H MOORE (Marker 72, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO B 7 REGT INFANTRY, MARCH 29 1860
Source: Return (March 1860): Died, William H. Moore, Private, B, March 29th, 60, Camp Floyd, of pneumonia.

JAMES MULLEN (Marker 40, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO I 5 REGT INFANTRY, MARCH 10 1859
Source: Return (March 1859): Died, Pvt. James Mullins, Co F, Mar 10, 59, Camp Floyd. (No cause stated.)

BENJAMIN NEWELL (Marker 74, Group C)
ILLINOIS, PRIVATE, CO A 7 REGT INFANTRY, APRIL 8 1860
Source: Return (April 1860): Died, Pvt. Benjamin Newell, Co A, 8 April '60 Camp Floyd, U.T., Suicide.

EDWARD NIELAND (Marker 41, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO K 7 REGT INFANTRY, MARCH 27 1859
Source: Return (March 1859): Died, Pvt. Edward Nieland, Co A, Mar 27, 1859, Camp Floyd, U.T., of Typhoid Fever.

ROBERT W NOBLE (Marker 57, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO H 5 REGT INFANTRY, OCTOBER 7 1859
Source: Return (October 1859): Died, Pvt. Robert W. Noble, Co H, Oct. 9, 1859, Camp Floyd, U.T. (Register, Roll 26, 181, states cause was "disease".)

CHARLES O'BRIEN (Marker 84, Group C)
NEW YORK, PRIVATE, CO B, 2 REGT DRAGOONS July 15 1861
O'Brien was probably the last soldier buried at Camp Floyd. The camp was being abandoned at the time of this death.
Source: Return (July 1861): Died, C. O'Brien, B, July 15, 1861, Ft. Crittenden, U.T., died of disease. (Camp Floyd was renamed Fort Crittenden in 1861.)

MICHAEL O'BRIEN (Marker 37, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO A 2 REGT DRAGOONS FEBRUARY 23 1859
Source: Return (February 1859): Died, Died of disease. . . O'Brien, . . .(illegible).(Register, Roll 24, 169 gives “aneurism” as cause and Camp Floyd as the place.)

THOMAS O'CONNOR (Marker 61, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO H 10 REGT INFANTRY, DECEMBER 10 1859
Capt. Tracy in his diary notes that O'Connor swallowed a stick which lodged in his bowel, causing terrible suffering.30
Source: Return (December 1859): Died, Pvt. Thomas O'Connor, Co H, Dec. 10, '59, Camp Floyd, Disease Enteritis.

EDWARD O'HARA (Marker 71, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO D 7 REGT INFANTRY, MARCH 12 1860
Source: Return (December 1860): Died, Pvt. Edward O'Hara, Co I, March 12th '60, Camp Floyd, U.T., shot on the night of 12th March by a sentinel of the Guard and at Camp Floyd, U.T.

CHRISTIAN OTTERBACK (Marker 69, Group C)
CORPORAL, CO A 4 REGT ARTILLERY, FEBRUARY 11 1860
Source: Return (February 1860): Died, Cpl. Christian Otterback, Co A, date unknown, Found dead near camp February 11, 1860 leaving evidence. . . murdered . . .

GEORGE PAIGE (Marker 42, Group C)
NEW HAMPSHIRE, CAPTAIN QMD, MEXICAN WAR, APRIL 18 1859
Source: J. Cecil Alter, “The Utah War, 1858-1860,” 67 (Death & funeral of Paige, 18 April, 1859 and 19 April 59, buried at Camp Floyd. (Phelps indicates the disease causing death was “delirium tremens”.)31

RALPH PIKE (Marker 52, Group C)
SERGEANT, CO I 10 REGT INFANTRY, AUGUST 14 1859
Died in Salt Lake City. Burial at Camp Floyd. Source: Return (August 1859): Died, 1st Sgt. Ralph Pike, Co I, Aug 15, 1859, G.S.L. City, Died of wounds received by Mormon Assassin.

ELIAS K POTTS (Marker 43, Group C)
DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA, 2D LIEUTENANT, CO C 7 REGT INFANTRY, APRIL 23 1859
Source: Records of Camp Floyd and Fort Crittenden:32 . . . report the death of 2nd Lt. Elias K. Potts, by inflammation of the bowels brought on from some slight imprudence of diet.

WILLIAM REDDING (Marker 63, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO C 7 REGT INFANTRY, DECEMBER 20 1859
Source: Return (December 1859): Died, Pvt. William Redding, Co C, Dec 20, '59, Camp Floyd, U.T., Ebrietus.

TERENCE ROONEY (Marker 73, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO A 7 REGT INFANTRY, MARCH 30 1860
Source: Return (March 1860): Died, Pvt. Terence Rooney, Co A, March 30th '60, Camp Floyd, U.T. of Diabetes.

HENRY SHIELDS (Marker 83, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO B 2 REGT DRAGOONS, SEPTEMBER 17 1860
Source: Return (September 1860): Died, Pvt. Henry Shields, Co B, Sep 17, 1860, Camp Floyd, U.T. (No cause stated.)

THOMAS M SLITER (Marker 36, Group C)
NEW YORK, PRIVATE, CO B 7 REGT INFANTRY, DECEMBER 19 1858
Source: Return (December 1858): Died, Pvt. Thomas M. Sliter, Co B, Dec 19, '58, Camp Floyd, U.T., of disease.

JAMES STEWART (Marker 68, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO D 5 REGT INFANTRY, JANUARY 22 1860
Source: Return (February 1860): Died, Pvt. James Stewart, Co D, Feb 22, 1860, Camp Floyd, the result of accid. Discharge of a pistol in the hands of a private of same company. (Note: Date of death is February 22 according to the return. Register, Roll 25, 223 gives cause as "Shot while on pass." This might mean he was shot by sentries when returning from a pass. Sentries had been given orders to shoot soldiers sneaking into the camp.)

JAMES SWEENY (Marker 31, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO C 7 REGT INFANTRY, NOVEMBER 18 1858
Source: Return (November 1858): Died, Pvt. James Sweeny, Co C, Nov 18/58, Camp Floyd, U.T. of disease. (Register Roll 26, 223 states cause as "Hemorrhage of the stomach".)

CHARLES C THRALL (Marker 35, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO E 5 REGT INFANTRY, NOVEMBER 28 1858
Source: Return (November 1858): Died, Pvt. Charles C. Thrall, Co B, Nov. 28, '58, Camp Floyd. (No cause stated.)

THEODORE TRITTLE (Marker 67, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO C 4 REGT ARTILLERY, JANUARY 9 1860
Source: Return (January 1860): Died, Pvt. Theodore Trittle, Co A, Jan 9, '60, Camp Floyd, Died of disease while waiting trial for desertion.

HENRY C TUCKER (Marker 38, Group C)
SERGEANT, CO I 5 REGT INFANTRY, MARCH 4 1859
Source: Return (March 1859): Died, Sgt. Henry C. Tucker, Co I, Mar 4, 59, Camp Floyd. (No cause stated.)

JAMES H WARREN (Marker 70, Group C)
NEW YORK, PRIVATE, CO K 5 REGT INFANTRY, FEBRUARY 21 1860
Source: Return (February 1860): Died, Pvt. James H. Warren, Co K, Feb 21, 1860, Camp Floyd, ordinary disease.

MICHAEL WHELAN (Marker 45, Group C)
PRIVATE, CO G 5 REGT INFANTRY, MAY 31 1859
While he died at Goshen, U.T., about 20 miles from Camp Floyd, he was probably buried at Camp Floyd.
Source: Return (May 1859): Died, Pvt. Michael Wheyland, Co G, May 31, 1859, Goshen, U.T., Accidentally shot. (Spelling of name is "Whelan" in the Soldiers and Sailors System.)


Appendix B - Other Utah Expedition Deaths

The following is a list of thirty-one enlisted men who died while in service with the Army of Utah, but are not represented by markers in the Camp Floyd Cemetery. James McGiffert and Phillip Rivers would have been buried at Camp Floyd. The rest died some distance from Camp Floyd, as near as can be determined from the sometimes faded documents. Death information has been found in the Regimental Returns of the individual units, the Register of Enlistments (National Archives microfilm series 233), or other sources noted.33
Only those men who died while assigned to a unit then active in the Utah Expedition are listed. The poor condition of some of the old records when microfilmed makes it impossible to have a comprehensive list.

ANTHONY, Joseph, Private, Co. D., 10th Infantry, March 14, 1860
Place of death: Fort Bridger
Source: Return (March 1860): Died, Joseph Anthony, Pvt. D, March 14, 60, Ft. Bridger, Congestion of the lungs.34 (Register, Roll 26, 3 confirms this information except gives death date one day later.)

BRADLEY, Thomas, Private, Co. F, 2nd Dragoons, June 12, 1860
Place of death: Snake River
Source: Return (June 1860): Died, Thomas Bradley, Pvt., F, June 12, 60, Snake River, while on detached service.

CARRIER, William, Recruit, Co. K, 5th Infantry, February 22, 1859
Place of death: Fort Laramie, N.T.
Source: Return (February 1859): Died, William Carrier, Rct., Co. K, Fort Laramie, ordinary.

CLARK, GEORGE W., Private, Co. I, 10th Infantry, died some time between October 8, 1857 when he deserted from his company and March 1858 when his body was discovered hanging from a tree.
Place of death: Smith’s fork.35 Little else is known. Although it is a popular opinion Clark was hung by the Nauvoo Legion, sometimes soldiers ran afoul of mountaineers or teamsters and Clark could have been the victim of either.

CROSBY, Edward, Private, Co. A, 3rd Infantry, March 1858
Place of death: Camp Scott
Source: Return (March 1858): Died, Crosby, Edward, Pvt., 3rd I, A, Mar 58, Camp Scott. (Return difficult to read, date in question.)

DALLEN, Michael, Recruit, 2nd Dragoons, Died August 31, 1859, Place of death: Camp on Round Prairie (Heber Valley), U.T.
Source: Register, Roll 26, 296.

DOODY, Peter, Private, Co. B, 4th Artillery, December 11, 1857
Place of death: Camp Scott
Source: Register, Roll 25, 53: Doody, Peter, 4th Arty, B, Died 18 Dec. 57, Camp Scott, U.T., a private. (No cause stated; apparent death date discrepancy of seven days.)

FEATHERSTONE, Patrick, Private, Co. A, 5th Infantry, July 6, 1857
Place of death: On a steamship going toward Ft. Leavenworth, en route to Utah
Source: Return (July 1857): Died, Patrick Featherstone, Pvt., A, 5 I July 6, 1857, Steamship en route to Utah. (No cause stated.)

FLETCHER, William, Private, Co. H, 10th Infantry, October 27, 1859
Place of death: Fort Bridger.
Source: Return (October 1859): Died, William Fletcher, Pvt., H, Oct. 27, 59, Fort Bridger, U.T. (Register, Roll 25, 68, confirms data, except gives the company as "K". No cause stated in either document.)

HURLY, James, Private, Co. F, 7th Infantry, March 4, 1859
Place of death: Fort Bridger
Source: Return (March 1859): Died, James Hurly, Pvt, F, Mar. 4, 59, Ft. Bridger, U.T.36

KENEDY, JOHN, Private, Co. H, 4th Artillery, 7 October 1858
Place of death: Camp Walbach, Cheyenne Pass.
Source: Return (October 1858): Died, Kenedy, John, private, H, Camp Walbach, Cheyenne Pass, . . . disease of the heart. (Register, Roll 25, 251 confirms above and gives cause as "inflammation of the heart".)

KISTENFEGGER, Lawrence, Recruit, 7th Infantry, June 27, 1858
Place of death: On the trail to Utah, probably near Fort Kearny. He was with one of the detachments of infantry recruits sent forward in early 1858.
Source: Register, Roll 26, 111: Kistenfegger, Lawrence, d. 27 June 58, en route to Utah, of disease.

LAFRENZ, Charles, Private, Co. C, 5th Infantry, April 12, 1858
Place of death: Camp Scott
Source: Return (April 1859): Died, Charles Lafrenz, 1Sgt, C, April 12, 1858, Camp Scott, U.T. Register, Roll 24, 24 gives cause as "heart disease". (Spelling may be "LeFranz".)

LOCKE, Davis, Recruit, 7th Infantry, June 3 1858.
Place of death: On the plains en route to Utah
Source: Register, Roll 26, 122: Died, Locke, Davis, 7th I Regt., 3 June '58, "typhoid fever", on the plains en route to Utah, a recruit.

LOGSTON, George I., Private, Company C, 10th Infantry, September 9, 1857
Place of death: Camp on Platte River
Source: Return (September 1857): Died, George I. Logston, Pvt., C, Sep 9 ‘57, Camp on Platte River. Accidental discharge of gun in his own hands. Register, Roll 25, 128 confirms information.

MCGIFFERT, James, Recruit, 2nd Dragoons, November 4, 1858
Place of death: Salt Lake City, U.T.
Source: Register, Roll 24, 153: Died, James McGiffert, 4 Nov 58, at Great Salt Lake City, a Recruit. (No cause or details given.)

MORGAN, John, Private, Company A, 7th Infantry, September 12, 1858
Place of death: Platt Bridge, N.T.
Source: Return (September 1858): Died, John Morgan, Pvt., A, Sep 25, 1858, Platte Bridge, N.T., of disease.

MORTON, Wm. A., Sergeant, Company K, 10th Infantry, March 1858
Place of death: Between Camp Scott and Fort Garland, New Mexico.
Source: Return (March 1858): Died, Wm. A. Morton, Sergeant, K, on detached service to New Mexico. (Died while on Captain Marcy's winter relief expedition to New Mexico.37 Register, Roll 25, 138: Died, William A. Morton, on the headwaters of Rio Grande, N.M., a Sergeant.)

MOSELY, Edward, Private, 10th Infantry, March 30 1858
Place of death: Camp Scott
Source: Return (March 1858): Died, Edward Mosely, 10th Inf., C, died Camp Scott 30 Mar. 58.

MURPHY, James, Private, Company K, 7th Infantry, September 12, 1858
Place of death: Fort Bridger, U.T.
Source: Return (September 1858): Died, James Murphy, Pvt., K, Sep. 12, 57, Ft. Bridger, of disease.

NADDY, John, Recruit, 2nd Dragoons. August 3, 1858
Place of death: On the trail to Utah, probably near Fort Bridger, based on the date.
Source: Register, Roll 26, 179: Died, Naddy, John, at Camp . . . , en route to Utah, "killed by the accidental discharge of a pistol", a Recruit.

O'SHEA, Dennis, Private, Company H, 10th Infantry, September 10, 1857
Place of death: Camp on Platte River
Source: Return (September 1857): Died, Dennis O'Shea, pvt. H, Sep 10, 57, Camp on Platte River, Hemorrhage of the lungs.

PRESTON, George T., Corporal, Company G, 10th Infantry, December 16, 1860
Place of death: Fort Bridger
Source: Return (December 1860): Died, George T. Preston, Cpl., G, Dec 17, 60, Ft. Bridger. (No cause stated.)

RIVERS, Phillip, Bugler, Co. B, 2nd Dragoons, December 11, 1858
Source: Register, Roll 25, 182: Died, Camp Floyd (No cause stated.)

ROSS, Robert, Private, Company C, 10th Infantry, September 10, 1857
Place of death: Fort Laramie, N.T.38
Source: Return (September 1857): Died, Robert Ross, Pvt. C, Fort Laramie, of remittent fever. (Register, Roll 25, 212, confirms information except date given as 19 Sep 1857.)

SASSA, Hermann, Private, Company I, 10th Infantry, July 5 or 6, 1859
Place of death: Fort Bridger
Source: Return (July 1859): Died, Pvt. Hermann Sassa, Fort Bridger, I Company July 5 or 6, suicide.

SCHUMAKER, William, Recruit, Dragoons, 11 August, 1858.
Place of death: On the trail to Utah, probably near Fort Laramie.
Dragoon recruits were with the 6th Column, Utah Forces, which was between Chimney Rock and Fort Laramie in early August, 1858.
Source: Register, Roll 26, 227: Schumaker, William, Died 11 Aug 58, at Camp No. . . . , en route to Utah, a recruit. (No cause stated.)

SLAYTER, William G., Private, Company A, Engineers, July 19, 1858
Place of death: Bridger's Pass, Nebraska Territory.
The company of Engineers was part of 1st Column, Utah Forces in 1858.
Source: Register, Roll 25, 228: Died, 19 July 58 Bridger's Pass, N.T. a private. (No cause stated.)

WHEELER, Joseph I., Private, Company C or K, 6th Infantry, April 17 1858
Place of death: Camp near Chimney Rock, N.T.
Source: Register, Roll 25, 260: Wheeler, Joseph I., 6th Inf., C/K, died "suddenly", 17 Apr '58, at camp near Chimney Rock, en route to Utah, a private.

WHITNEY, Josiah, Private, Co. G, 2nd Dragoons, October 19, 1857 Place of death: En route to Utah. Colonel Cooke, in his report stated: "Private Whitney, of Company G, died in camp near Chimney Rock, of lockjaw. He was buried on the bluff, with the honors of war, next morning at sunrise.”39
Source: Return (October 1857): Died, Josiah Whitney, En route to Utah, Oct. 19, 1857 (No cause stated.

WIGGINS, William, Co. F, 5th Infantry, October 1, 1859
Place of death: Fort Laramie
Source: Return (October 1859): Died, William Wiggins, Private F Oct 1 ’59 Camp near Fort Laramie, Accidentally killed by a wagon passing over his body.

Appendix C – Locations of Military Camps Where Deaths Occurred

Camp Scott: Temporary camp centered near Fort Bridger which comprised the whole encampment of the several regiments of the Expedition during the winter of 1857-58. Although Camp Scott had definite limits and was less than a mile square, this designation was sometimes used to cover a wide area in the Bridger Valley, even as far as Burnt Fork, forty miles from Fort Bridger. The camp was abandoned by the Army when the march began to the Salt Lake Valley in June, 1858.

Camp Winfield: Near the Ham’s Fork crossing of the Pioneer Trail, about thirty miles from Fort Bridger.

Camp near Medicine Butte: This may be the butte so marked on current maps about ten miles north of Evanston, Wyoming.

Fort Supply: This is almost certainly the “New Fort Supply”40 on Smith’s Fork in the Bridger Valley, on Smith’s Fork. There was a fort built by the Mormons in 1853 and burned as Johnston's Army approached Utah Territory in 1857. It was about twelve miles southwest of Fort Bridger near Smith’s Fork, tributary to the Green River.

Camp Walbach: Between Cheyenne and Laramie in Wyoming on the Lodgepole Creek trail.

Camp Floyd: Camp Floyd, Utah County, Utah, temporarily established July 8, 1858 in the northwest corner of Cedar Valley (Upper Camp) and later moved ten miles south to the site near Fairfield which was occupied beginning September 8, 1858, then abandoned in July, 1861. The army occupied “Upper Camp Floyd” for two months. Two soldiers, Heinrich Grava, Charles Akerly, and one unknown teamster appear to have been buried at the upper camp.

Fort Buchanan, N.M.: In the southeast corner of present-day Arizona.

Fort Defiance, N.M.: In present-day Arizona, 35 miles northwest of Gallup, N.M.

Fort Dalles, Oregon: On the Columbia River, near the present city of The Dalles.

Fort Yuma, California: This post, established in 1850, was on the Colorado River opposite the present city of Yuma, Arizona.

Camp Ruby: About 150 miles from Camp Floyd, between Ely and Elko in present Nevada. A stagecoach and Pony Express station was established at Egan Canyon and detachments of the Fourth Artillery from Camp Floyd fought two engagements with Indians near the station in the summer of 1860. There, Private Conly was seriously wounded and was soon transported to Camp Ruby in the valley of the same name, where he died. This camp was briefly used as a base for suppression of Indian attacks on the immigrant and Pony Express trails. It later became a semi-permanent facility under the direction of Colonel Patrick E. Connor and named Fort Ruby.

Camp No. 6: Location not stated, but most likely along the trail used by troops leaving Utah as part of the Utah Expedition was ordered to New Mexico in 1860. This trail led up Spanish Fork canyon approximating the route of present U.S. Highway 6. The camp may have been on the sixth day of travel to total perhaps sixty miles. This would place the camp somewhere near Thistle, Utah.

Some information for the above is from Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register and Dictionary of the U.S. Army (USGPO, Washington: 1903) Vol. 2, and Robert W. Frazer, Forts of the West, (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1963.)

Appendix D - Notes on Sources

Official military sources. Most of the military sources listed below are available from the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) on microfilm. Many of these films are also available at the LDS Family History Library, Salt Lake City.

Regimental Returns. Each regiment of the U.S. Regular Army was required by regulation to prepare and submit a monthly report on a prepared form. This document, which eventually made its way to the Adjutant General’s office, was a combination of statistical and personnel information. Commissioned Officers of the regiment were detailed with their location and status. Strengths of the companies and the regiment were detailed including gains and losses of enlisted men by name, including new recruits, transfers, desertions and deaths. The National Archives microfilm numbers for the units identified on the cemetery markers are: 1st Artillery: 727/Roll 4(1534488); 1st Cavalry: 744/Roll 40 (1602147); 2nd Dragoons: 744/Roll 17 (1602124); 3rd Artillery: 727/Roll 20 (1534504); 3rd Infantry: 665/Roll 32 (1579263); 4th Artillery: 727/Roll 28 (1534512); 5th Infantry: 665/Roll 56 (1579287); 7th Infantry: 665/Roll 80 (1579311 and 1579312); 9th Infantry: 665/Roll 102 (1579333); 10th Infantry: 665/Roll 113 (1579344). The numbers in parentheses are the film numbers of the LDS Family History collection in Salt Lake City.

Register of Enlistments. This record is a listing of enlistments in the regular army by year and name. It gives the details of an individual’s place of birth, occupation, physical description, assigned unit and history of discharge, desertion, death, etc. with date, place and rank at time of event. They are sorted within year and by first letter of surname but not alphabetized within the first letter group. This supplements the death information available in the returns. The NARA microfilm is 233. Rolls 24 through 27 are pertinent to the Utah Expedition. Some of the rolls have missing page numbers or the numbers are obscured. The Family History Library film numbers for the Register of Enlistments that are pertinent are 350330 through 350333.

Soldiers and Sailors System. This database includes names of those that served in the Civil War and since it reaches back to regular army enlistments as early as 1855, it covers most of the soldiers of the Utah Expedition. It is (as of 2006) available at http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/. Some national battlefield parks also have the system on computers at the visitor centers.

Orders and Correspondence. General and special orders and correspondence concerning the Utah Expedition, Camp Floyd and Fort Bridger are available in Records Group 98, NARA on microfilm. This information is included in LDS Family History Film No. 1666080.

Journals and Diaries. Several officers and enlisted men kept accounts of the activities of the Utah Expedition either in journal form or in letters. The most useful of these are:

Captain Jesse A. Gove, 10th Infantry. Gove’s letters to his wife, Maria, and to an eastern newspaper are included in The Utah Expedition, 1857 – 1858, edited by Otis G. Hammond and published by New Hampshire Historical Society, Concord, 1928.

Captain Albert Tracy, 10th Infantry. The published portions of Tracy’s journal cover the period March 24, 1858 to April 30, 1860. This was published as The Utah War, Journal of Capt. Albert Tracy, 1858 – 1860, in the Utah Historical Quarterly, Vol 13, 1947, (all of numbers 1, 2, 3 & 4), Utah State Historical Society, Salt Lake.

Captain John W. Phelps, 4th Artillery. This officer commanded Light Battery B of the 4th Artillery from Fort Leavenworth to Camp Floyd. He kept an informative journal which is available in the Utah State Historical Library in typescript form (MSS B 120, Box 1) and covers 1857 to 1859.

Private Charles A. Scott. This enlisted man served in Light Company “B” of the 4th Artillery from the beginning of the Expedition until leaving Camp Floyd in 1861. His diary provides a perspective of the enlisted ranks: Robert E. Stowers and John M. Giles, Eds., Charles A. Scott’s Diary of the Utah Expedition, 1857 – 1861. Utah Historical Quarterly, Volume 28, 1960. CD, Utah Historical Views, Edition 4, 2001. Also printed in a lesson pamphlet of the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, May, 1996.

Endnotes
1Interview with Mr. Mark Trotter, Manager, Camp Floyd/ Stagecoach Inn State Park, June 6, 2003.
2Adjutant General’s Office, Regimental Returns for United States Infantry Regiments, 10th Infantry, January 1859: Died, F, Captain Matthew Pitcher at New York, NY, September 17, 1858 per letter received from A.G.O. date of Washington, D.C. December 18, 1858. Note: Regimental Returns hereafter cited as Return, with regiment and month identified.
3Return, 4th Artillery, August 1860: Died, Thomas Conly, Pvt, B, 13 Aug 60 Ruby Valley U.T. of wounds received in action with Indians at Egan Canyon, U.T., 11 August 1860.
4Capt. John Wolcott Phelps Papers, 1857-1859,October 18, 1857, MSS B 120, Utah State Historical Society, Salt Lake City.
5Return, 2nd Dragoons, July 1859: Died, of disease, Bvt. Major Samuel C. Ridgely, D.C., 6 July 1859.
6See Appendix, Other Utah Expedition Deaths, entries for James McGiffert and Phillip Rivers.
7Don R. Mathis, “Camp Floyd in Retrospect” (M.A. Thesis, University of Utah, 1959), 38.

8Telephone interview with Rex Bass, American Legion District 8, Kearns, Utah, June 11, 2003. Mr. Bass remembered it as being the “National Archives.”
9This caption is on the back of photograph 4510 in the Utah State Historical Society collection. The caption reads: "Pictures 3 to 9 are progress pictures of the placing of markers on the graves at Camp Floyd by members of District 8 of the American Legion. The plots are symbolic in a sense because the original graveyard had been leveled and exact location could not be determined."
10Even had detailed burial records with plot numbers been available, physical reference points would have had to survive to determine the exact location of the graves.
11The three lists are: (1) a set of typed burial cards attributed to the Utah Archives and Records Service and available on microfiche #6081187 at the LDS Family History Library - date unknown, (2) a list contained in the typescript Military Forts of Utah and Utah Territory and their Cemeteries prepared by the Utah Chapter, Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America, compiled 1950-1951, (3) a list contained in Irma Hance and Irene Ware, Johnston, Connor and the Mormons (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1961),96-100.
12The third mentioned list includes "Civilian Lawrence Histenfegger" with a death date of "June 1858". The actual name was Kistenfeger, and he was an infantry recruit.
13See also Notes on Sources – Appendix D.
14Harold D. Langley Ed., To Utah with the Dragoons. (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 1974), 28-29.
15War Department, Regimental Returns of Regular Army regiments. See Appendix, Notes on Sources.
16Verified by reviews of the extensive records relating to the Expedition, both in the advance units that came to Utah Territory in 1857 and the later six columns of additional forces that came to the Territory or were recalled when the peace initiative was successful.
17 Although no exact location can be found for the explosion, there was steamboat travel on the Rio Grande River, to Ringgold Barracks upstream from the mouth, which was about fifty miles, then further upstream as far as 140 miles. See Handbook of Texas Online, http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/NN/etnl.html
18Adjutant General’s Office, Register of Enlistments in the United States Army, 1798-1914, (Washington: National Archives and Records Administration 1855-62), M233, Roll 25, pg. 153. Hereafter cited as Register, with roll number and page given. See Notes on Sources, Appendix.
19Register, Roll 25, 227. When cause is not stated, it may not have been known to the adjutant compiling the return or other record. When “disease” or “ordinary disease” is stated, the attending physician may not have been able to diagnose the disease. See note relating to Jacob Hilt, in Group “B”.
20 Otis G. Hammond, Ed. The Utah Expedition, 1857-1858, Letters of Capt. Jesse A. Gove (Concord: New Hampshire Historical Society, 1928), 68 (entry for November 11, 1857).
21Hammond, “The Utah Expedition, 1857-1858”, 221.
22 Asst. Surgeon Roberts Bartholow performed a complete autopsy on Hilt’s body at Fort Bridger, even weighing his liver and brain. Bartholow seemed to suspect Mountain Fever as the cause of death. He apparently settled on typhoid. See Statistical Report on the sickness and mortality of army of the United States, by United States Army Surgeon General’s Office, Utah State Historical Society Library, Call No. 356.92 C 77a, p. 308.
23 Hilt’s “rank” of Farrier is consistent with listings of other specialists such as “Blacksmith”, “Armourer”, etc. in the military records.
24National Park Service, Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System, available on the Internet and at many National Military Parks by onsite computer. The database also includes names of those who served prior to the Civil War back to January 1, 1855. See Appendix D - Notes on Sources.
25Francis B. Heitman, Historical Register and Dictionary of the U.S.Army, 2 vols. 2 (Washington: USGPO 1903), 2, 521.
26 Phelps, October 18, 1857.
27George P. Hammond, Campaigns of the West 1856-1861, The Journal and Letters of Colonel John Van Deusen DuBois (Tuscon: Arizona Pioneer Historical Society, 1949), 69.
28Hammond, “The Utah Expedition, 1857-58”, 65. Gove writes: “One man in H. Co., Capt. Tracy’s, died of fright.” The event that caused his death (heart attack) was the raid by Porter Rockwell on the army’s mule herd on the night of September 25, 1857. Gove describes this raid on pages 64 and 65.
29Archaic medical term. Modern spelling "ebrietas” meaning intoxication. See also entry for Redding, William.
30Alter, “The Utah War, 1858-1860”, 79.
31Phelps, April 18, 1859.
32Headquarters, Department of Utah, letter to Adjutant General’s Office, Washington, D.C. April 23, 1859, National Archives and Records Service, Records Group 98, Family History Library microfilm #1666080. See also Alter, “The Utah War, 1858-1860”, 67.
33See Appendix D, Notes on Sources.

34Also see Note below. Joseph Anthony, died and buried March 18, 1860, shows in the Department of Veterans Affairs database for soldiers whose remains were relocated to Fort McPherson National Cemetery.
35Hammond, “The Utah Expedition, 1857-1858”, 131. Clark was enlisted June 8, 1855. He was 25 years old at the time and was from Washington, Vermont, as reported in the Register, roll 25, 38. Neither the Return nor the Register reports his death.
36When the National Cemetery system was being extended to the West—beginning in 1872, known burials at abandoned military posts were disinterred and reburied at some of the designated cemeteries. Fort McPherson National Cemetery in Lincoln County, Nebraska received the remains of many soldiers and pioneers buried at Western forts and along the pioneer trails. Twenty-three were disinterred from Fort Bridger, 133 from Fort Laramie and eight from LaBonte Creek, where Utah Expedition units camped, some for nearly two weeks. Not all were identified and the Fort McPherson cemetery has 361 markers inscribed "Unknown", from History and Stories of Nebraska by Addison Erwin Sheldon, Univ. of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, 1913. "James Hurley , PVT, 7th INF" is shown in the Department of Veterans Affairs database for this cemetery as having died March 4, 1859; this is obviously James Hurly as listed above with an alternate spelling. "Hurley" is also the spelling in the NPS Soldiers and Sailors System. See http://www.qmfound.com/expansion_of_the_national_cemetery_system_1880_1900.htm. It is not clear why Camp Floyd cemetery was not included while Fort Bridger and even Fort Hall, Idaho were. Perhaps the lack of records as noted by modern researchers would have left the Camp Floyd cemetery intact. In contrast, La Bonte Creek was not a military cemetery, yet pioneers from that private ground were disinterred. Perhaps the lack of burial records contributed to the decision to exclude Camp Floyd.
37 Although no cause of death is given in the record, it has been assumed by historians that Morton died of exposure and starvation. It is now accepted he died of overeating after weeks of near-starvation on the trail. See William P. MacKinnon’s review of the reprint of Moorman and Sessions’ Camp Floyd and the Mormons in Journal of Mormon History, Fall 2006, p. 229.
38Those who died at Fort Laramie from trapper and pioneer days until 1872 were buried in a cemetery then existing at the fort. In 1872, a new hospital was constructed directly over the cemetery without removal of the remains buried there. See Fort Laramie Park History, by Merrill J. Mattes, Rocky Mountain Regional Office, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, September, 1980, Part I, Chapter XV.
39Theophilus F. Rodenbough, From Everglade to Canyon with the Second United States Cavalry, 187. The 2nd U.S. Dragoons regiment was renamed the U.S. 2nd Cavalry in 1861.
40Theophilus F. Rodenbaugh, From Everglade to Canyon with the Second United States Cavalry, 227.


















































11 comments:

C. R. Allen said...

I too, love a historical mystery such as this. Without local records/recountings explaining what and why these things were done. it will always be open to conjecture.

debunci said...

Yes What a mystery! We may never know why these graves were marked as so. I've been searching for my Great Great Grandfather, who I can't seem to find much of after he left Fort laramie,Wyoming in about 1858-1865,who knows maybe he is among the lost souls buried out there under the sagebushes of Wyoming never to be found! How sad!
His name was thomas conroy, a blacksmith.

Barely Alive said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Melo said...

I am interested in the Utah War and Camp Floyd because I believe one of the soldiers is haunting my house. I live in Central Orem.

Little Bic said...

Thank you Mr. Allen for your excellent blog on Camp Floyd. I had previously done a search for information on Camp Floyd, but yours is the most extensive that I have seen. I was looking for information on James B. Cook/Cooke who was at Camp Floyd, but died in Nevada. If you have any information on him, I would be appreciative. However, I was most excited to see the information on Capt Matthew S. Pitcher as he is one my ancestor's descendants. Would it be possible to get a copy of the letter notifying the camp of his death? If you have any recommendations of how I could get further information on either of these men, I would appreciate it. Thank you so much.

Duane B said...

Little Bic: James B. Cooke was a private in Co B, Second Dragoons. He was discharged on August 23, 1858, due to expiration of service. Since he was discharged on August 23, 1858, he was never stationed at Camp Floyd/Fairfield. He was stationed at Old Camp Floyd, or Upper Camp Floyd, some ten miles north of Camp Floyd/Fairfield. Source: Nielson, Roll Call at Old Camp Floyd, Utah Territory, 2006, pages 124-25.

My appologies if Mr. Allen has already contacted you with this information.

bluka said...

Very impressive work you've done. I can't imagine how many hours you must have put into this research. Thank you for posting this here for me and others to view.

I'm trying to solve a mystery as I gather information about the Flacks from Fairfield. They were in the Sheep business in the 1850's. I'm trying to determine if John Logan Flack arrived with the army, or if he was already a resident of Fairfield when Camp Floyd came to be. This is one of many questions I'm trying to research.

Thanks again for your post.

Ray said...

Wow! Such great research. I recently spent a great 2 day re-enactment camp with my son and his scout troop at Camp Floyd. I love the dedication of those who shared this part of our history. I agree that a committee should be created to address the issues raised about those who died there. I think it is a great idea to change it to a memorial park with this research explaining why this was done. I wonder if a grant from the Department of Defense might help defray the costs? Eagle Scout projects could be identified to help get volunteers to provide the labor for this project.

Vernal Forbes said...

I am very disappointed that the obviously-original headstones have been removed. My great grandfather, Martin Forbes, was stationed at Camp Douglas, and placed a headstone for his first wife, Anna, in the cemetery - or at least, it was there until recently. Anna died from complications of childbirth at the young age of 17 at Camp Douglas. Even if this headstone was not accurately placed over her burial place, it was a beautiful ORIGINAL headstone with a poignant remembrance from her disconsolate husband. I would like to know if these markers were destroyed or preserved somewhere. I am even more dissapointed that this well-preserved headstone did not deserve mention in your listing of the people presumed buried at the Camp Douglas cemetery. That headstone is the only documentation of her short life,- - that she lived and died there.

Vernal Forbes said...

Please remove the last post from myself (Vernal Forbes). It was posted in error. My apologies!

najamonline4u said...

awesome post and thenks for giving the information about these granite markers.